Introduction to Psychology

Open Yale Course – Psychology with Professor Paul Bloom.

The Introduction to Psychology University lectures are provided FREE by Open Yale Courses.  We would like to thank Yale for making many of their university lectures freely available to the general public.  We hope you enjoy learning from the Introduction to Psychology lectures.

 

 Lecture 1: Introduction to Psychology


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

Professor Paul Bloom welcomes students and presents the course as a comprehensive introduction to the study of the human mind. Course readings and requirements are discussed. The five main branches of psychology are presented: neuroscience, which is a study of the mind by looking at the brain; developmental, which focuses on how people grow and learn; cognitive, which refers to the computational approach to studying the mind; social, which studies how people interact; and clinical, which examines mental health and mental illnesses.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Introduction to and Requirements for the Course
10:03 – Chapter 2. General Goals for the Course
13:07 – Chapter 3. Examples of Materials Covered in the Course

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

 

Lecture 2: Foundations – This Is Your Brain

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This lecture introduces students to two broad theories of how the mind relates to the body. Dualism is the ubiquitous and intuitive feeling that our conscious mind is separate from our physical bodies, whereas Materialism is the idea that all of our mental states are caused by physical states of the brain. This lecture reviews arguments explaining why materialism has become the predominant theory of mind in psychology. This discussion is followed by a basic overview of the neurophysiology of the brain.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Brain, the Mind and Dualism
12:06 – Chapter 2. Scientific Consensus Against Dualism
19:28 – Chapter 3. The Neuron: The Basic Building Blocks of Thought
32:58 – Chapter 4. The Different Parts of the Brain
44:47 – Chapter 5. Mechanist Conception and the Hard Problem of Consciousness

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses 
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 3: Foundations – Freud


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This lecture introduces students to the theories of Sigmund Freud, including a brief biographical description and his contributions to the field of psychology. The limitations of his theories of psychoanalysis are covered in detail, as well as the ways in which his conception of the unconscious mind still operate in mainstream psychology today.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Sigmund Freud in a Historical Context
06:51 – Chapter 2. Unconscious Motivation: The Id, Ego and Superego
13:45 – Chapter 3. Personality Development and Psychosexual Development
20:32 – Chapter 4. Defense Mechanisms, the Aims of Psychoanalysis, Dreams
29:11 – Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Freud’s Theories
32:55 – Chapter 6. Controversies and Criticisms on Freud’s Theories
42:10 – Chapter 7. Examples of the Unconscious in Modern Psychology
51:55 – Chapter 8. Further Question and Answer on Freud

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 4: Foundations – Skinner

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

Professor Bloom opens with a brief discussion of the value and evolutionary basis of unconscious processing. The rest of this lecture introduces students to the theory of Behaviorism, particularly the work of prominent behaviorist, B. F. Skinner. Different types of learning are discussed in detail, as well as reasons why behaviorism has been largely displaced as an adequate theory of human mental life.

00:00 – Chapter 1. A Brief Review on the Unconscious
06:32 – Chapter 2. B. F. Skinner and Behaviorism
11:45 – Chapter 3. Habituation: The Very Simplest Form of Learning
14:25 – Chapter 4. Classical Conditioning: Associating Stimulus
31:18 – Chapter 5. Operant Conditioning: Operating on the Environment
45:12 – Chapter 6. Question and Answer on Behaviorism
46:44 – Chapter 7. Controversies and Criticisms on Behaviorism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 5: What Is It Like to Be a Baby – The Development of Thought


This lecture explores issues and ideas related to the branch of psychology known as cognitive development. It begins with an introduction of Piaget who, interested in the emergence of knowledge in general, studied children and the way they learn about the world in order to formulate his theories of cognitive development. This is followed by an introduction to the modern science of infant cognition. Finally, the question of the relationship between and the existence of different kinds of development is addressed.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Jean Piaget, Stage Theory and Its Limits
12:50 – Chapter 2. The Modern Science of Infant Cognition
25:12 – Chapter 3. Babies in the Social World
31:26 – Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Learning and Development
33:53 – Chapter 5. Review of Studies Presented in Class; Autism
40:38 – Chapter 6. Question and Answer on Autism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 6: How Do We Communicate?  Language in the Brain, Mouth


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

One of the most uniquely human abilities is the capacity for creating and understanding language. This lecture introduces students to the major topics within the study of language: phonology, morphology, syntax and recursion. This lecture also describes theories of language acquisition, arguments for the specialization of language, and the commonalities observed in different languages across cultures.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Scientific Notion of Language and Structure
15:53 – Chapter 2. Phonology: A System of Sounds
24:07 – Chapter 3. Morphology: A System of Words
27:21 – Chapter 4. Syntax: Communicating Complicated Ideas
35:21 – Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Language Structure
39:10 – Chapter 6. Noam Chomsky and Language Acquisition
47:07 – Chapter 7. The Time Course of Language Acquisition

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 7: Conscious of the Present; Conscious of the Past – Language


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This lecture finishes the discussion of language by briefly reviewing two additional topics: communication systems in non-human primates and other animals, and the relationship between language and thought. The majority of this lecture is then spent on introducing students to major theories and discoveries in the fields of perception, attention and memory. Topics include why we see certain visual illusions, why we don’t always see everything we think we see, and the relationship between different types of memory.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Non-Human Communication
09:16 – Chapter 2. The Relationship Between Language and Thought
12:39 – Chapter 3. Question and Answer on Language
18:06 – Chapter 4. Introduction to the Complexity of Perception and Expectation
39:15 – Chapter 5. Linking Attention and Memory
58:04 – Chapter 6. Question and Answer on Attention and Memory

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 8: Conscious of the Present; Conscious of the Past


In this lecture, Professor Bloom reviews the basic psychological research on memory. Specific topics covered include the different memory types, memory limitations, strategies that improve memory, and memory disorders. This lecture also includes a discussion of several important social implications for memory research, such as recovered memories, and the influence of suggestibility on eyewitness testimony.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Distinctions Between Short-Term and Long-Term Memory
13:22 – Chapter 2. How Structure and Organization Affects Long-Term Memory
18:27 – Chapter 3. Memory Retrieval
25:50 – Chapter 4. Memory Failure
37:15 – Chapter 5. The Power of Suggestion on Memory
44:56 – Chapter 6. Hypnosis, Repressed Memory and Flashbulb Memories
52:45 – Chapter 7. Question and Answer on Memory

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 9: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason: Love – Guest Lecture by Peter Salovey


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

Guest lecturer Peter Salovey, Professor of Psychology and Dean of Yale College, introduces students to the dominant psychological theories of love and attraction. Specific topics include the different types of love, the circumstances that predict attraction, and the situations where people mistakenly attribute arousal for love.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Introduction to Dr Peter Salovey
01:41 – Chapter 2. Defining Love and Its Permutations
16:22 – Chapter 3. The Social Psychology of Love and Attraction
43:53 – Chapter 4. Misattribution for the Causes of Arousal
01:03:46 – Chapter 5. Question and Answer

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 10: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason – Evolution and Rationality


This lecture introduces students to the study of psychology from an evolutionary perspective, the idea that like the body, natural selection has shaped the development of the human mind. Prominent arguments for and against the theory of natural selection and its relationship to human psychology are reviewed. Students will hear several examples of how studying mental phenomenon from an evolutionary perspective can help constrain theories in psychology as well as explain many prevalent human instincts that underlie many of our most basic behaviors and decisions.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Modern Biological Account of the Origin of Psychological Phenomena
13:35 – Chapter 2. Avoiding Misconceptions When Applying Evolutionary Theory to Psychology
22:38 – Chapter 3. Claims Against the Evolutionary Psychology
26:42 – Chapter 4. Ways in Which Evolution Helps Describe the Mind
39:43 – Chapter 5. Heuristics: Framing Effects, Base Rates, Availability Bias and Confirmation Bias

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 11: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason – Emotions Part I


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This class is an introduction to the evolutionary analysis of human emotions, how they work, why they exist, and what they communicate. In particular, this lecture discusses three interesting case studies, that of happiness (e.g., smiling), fear and the emotions we feel towards our relatives. Finally, this lecture ends with a brief discussion of babies’ emotional responses to their caregivers.

00:00 – Chapter 1. The Different Functions of Emotions
09:06 – Chapter 2. Phineas Gage and The Loss of Emotional Capacity
15:45 – Chapter 3. Facial Expressions and Smiles in Particular
28:08 – Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Smiles
32:22 – Chapter 5. Non-Social Emotions: Fear
36:29 – Chapter 6. Social Emotions and Altruism

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 12: Evolution, Emotion, and Reason – Emotions Part II


Professor Bloom continues the discussion of emotions as useful evolutionary adaptations for dealing with our social environment. In particular, this lecture describes evolutionary explanations for several important emotional responses, such as the love between parents and their offspring, the gratitude we feel towards cooperative behaviors, the spite we feel for cheaters, and the cultural differences in feelings of revenge.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Emotional Responses to Caregivers and Kin
15:44 – Chapter 2. Question and Answer on Emotions Towards Kin
18:14 – Chapter 3. Evolutionary Explanations for Emotional Responses
25:20 – Chapter 4. Cooperative Behavior and The Prisoner’s Dilemma
40:43 – Chapter 5. The Ultimatum Game, Rationally and Irrationality
49:20 – Chapter 6. Cultures of Honor

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 13: Why Are People Different? Differences


Why are people different from one another? This lecture addresses this question by reviewing the latest theories and research in psychology on two traits in particular: personality and intelligence. Students will hear about how these traits are measured, why they may differ across individuals and groups, and whether they are influenced at all by one’s genes, parents or environment.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Personality, Intelligence and Determining Difference
13:53 – Chapter 2. Measuring Personality with “The Big Five”
19:47 – Chapter 3. Defining and Measuring Intelligence
30:29 – Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Personality and Intelligence
36:32 – Chapter 5.The Roles of Genes and Environment in Explaining Human Differences
51:16 – Chapter 6. Genes, Environment and Intelligence

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 14: What Motivates Us – Sex


This lecture reviews what evolutionary theories and recent studies in psychology can tell us about sex and gender differences. Students will hear how psychology can help explain many of the differences that exist in whom we find attractive, what we desire in a mate, and sexual orientation.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Addressing Morality and Inevitability on Evolution, Sex and Gender
10:47 – Chapter 2. Basic Sex Ed
19:22 – Chapter 3. Sex Differences Among Humans
32:15 – Chapter 4. Beauty: An Average Face
38:25 – Chapter 5. Social Factors for Sex Differences
45:52 – Chapter 6. Sexual Orientation
51:39 – Chapter 7. Question and Answer on Sex and Gender

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 15: A Person in the World of People – Morality


Professor Bloom provides an introduction to psychological theories of morality. Students will learn how research in psychology has helped answer some of the most central questions about human morality. For instance, which emotions are “moral” and why did these moral feelings evolve? What factors guide our moral judgments? And what factors predict when good people will do bad things?

00:00 – Chapter 1. Kin Selection, Cooperation and Moral Feelings
23:07 – Chapter 2. Moral Reasoning and Moral Judgments
38:46 – Chapter 3. Milgram’s Work in the Context of Morality
46:19 – Chapter 4. Two Forces for Evil, Two Forces for Good

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 16: A Person in the World of People – Self and Other Part I


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This is the first of two lectures on social psychology, the study of how we think about ourselves, other people, and social groups. Students will hear about the famous “six degrees of separation” phenomenon and how it illuminates important individual differences in social connectedness. This lecture also reviews a number of important biases that greatly influence how we think of ourselves as well as other people.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Social Psychology and Connections Between People
15:56 – Chapter 2. Aspects of the Self: The Spotlight and Transparency Effects
22:39 – Chapter 3. Aspects of the Self: You’re Terrific!
27:00 – Chapter 4. Aspects of the Self: Cognitive Dissonance
40:00 – Chapter 5. Self and the Other
50:03 – Chapter 6. How We Think About Other People

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Lecture 17: A Person in the World of People – Self and Other Part II


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This lecture begins with the second half of the discussion on social psychology. Students will learn about several important factors influencing how we form impressions of others, including our ability to form rapid impressions about people. This discussion focuses heavily upon stereotypes, including a discussion of their utility, reliability, and the negative effects that even implicit stereotypes can incur.

The second half of the lecture introduces students to two prominent mysteries in the field of psychology. First, students will learn what is known and unknown about sleep, including why we sleep, the different types of sleep, disorders, and of course, dreams, what they are about and why we have them. Second, this half reviews how laughter remains a mysterious and interesting psychological phenomenon. Students will hear theories that attempt to explain what causes us to laugh and why, with a particular emphasis on current evolutionary theory.

00:00 – Chapter 1. First and Fast: How We Form Impressions of Others
11:15 – Chapter 2. Positive Uses and Negative Effects of Stereotypes
27:19 – Chapter 3. Implicit Attitudes
34:47 – Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Stereotypes
38:09 – Chapter 5. The Minor Mystery of Sleep
44:49 – Chapter 6. The Greater Mystery of Dreams
51:31 – Chapter 7. The True Mystery of Laughter

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 18: What Happens When Things Go Wrong – Mental Illness Part I


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

Professor Susan Nolen-Hoeksema describes how modern clinical psychology both identifies and treats various mental disorders. Particular focus is placed upon mood disorders such as bipolar disorder and depression, including current diagnostic criteria and current practices for treatment.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Introduction to Dr Susan Nolen-Hoeksema
01:36 – Chapter 2. Behavioral Criteria for Accessing Mental Disorders
11:53 – Chapter 3. Unipolar Disorders
21:30 – Chapter 4. Bipolar Disorders
30:20 – Chapter 5. Statistics for Depression
34:04 – Chapter 6. Biological, Cognitive and Interpersonal Theories and Treatments

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 19: What Happens When Things Go Wrong – Mental Illness Part II


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

This lecture continues to cover one of the most salient areas within the field of psychology known as psychopathology, or clinical psychology. Following a discussion of the different ways of defining mental illness, Professor Bloom reviews several classes of clinical diagnoses including schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, and personality disorders. The lecture concludes with a brief introduction to therapy.

00:00 – Chapter 1. Identifying Mental Illness
11:30 – Chapter 2. Schizophrenia
24:51 – Chapter 3. Anxiety Disorders
30:35 – Chapter 4. Question and Answer on Schizophrenia and Anxiety Disorders
35:02 – Chapter 5. Dissociative Identity Disorders
44:58 – Chapter 6. Question and Answer on Dissociative Identity Disorders
46:31 – Chapter 7. Personality Disorders
54:33 – Chapter 8. Brief History on Therapy

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

 Lecture 20: The Good Life – Happiness


Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110)

The last lecture in the course wraps up the discussion of clinical psychology with a discussion of treatment efficacy. Does therapy actually work? Professor Bloom summarizes the different types of influences that clinical interventions might have on people who receive therapy.

Professor Bloom ends with a review of one of the most interesting research topics in “positive psychology,” happiness. What makes us happy? How does happiness vary across person and culture? What is happiness for? Students will hear how the most recent research in psychology attempts to answer these questions and learn how people are surprisingly bad at predicting what will make them happiest.

00:00 – Chapter 1. How and Why Therapy Works
07:48 – Chapter 2. Question and Answer on Therapy
11:16 – Chapter 3. Happiness and Positive Psychology
18:58 – Chapter 4. Getting Used to Happiness
42:41 – Chapter 5. Closing Remarks

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses
This course was recorded in Spring 2007.

 

Thank-you to Open Yale Courses for providing FREE University lectures on Introduction to Psychology.  If you have any suggestions for additional University lectures to be made available through Morwell Neighbourhood House, please contact us by phone on (03) 5134-5488 or E-Mail US.  Thank-you.

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